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Nanoporous oxide makes good memory device

July 17th, 2014

Rice’s silicon oxide technology can now be used to fabricate devices with conventional production methods, which brings it a step closer to mass production. James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted. Nanotechweb.org http://bit.ly/1nAni7M http://nanotechweb.org/cws/article/tech/57925

Nanoporous silicon oxide is back in the race for resistive memory

July 16th, 2014

Rice’s silicon oxide technology can now be used to fabricate devices with conventional production methods, which brings it a step closer to mass production. James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted. IEEE Spectrum http://bit.ly/1rr1r7G http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/memory/nanoporous-version-of-silicon-oxide-brings-it-back-into-the-race-for-resistive-memory

Potential replacement for flash memory gets a boost

July 14th, 2014

Rice researchers have improved the use of Resistive Random Access Memory to replace flash memory. Overclockers Club http://bit.ly/1zFzIVH http://www.overclockersclub.com/news/36578/

Rice employs nanoporous silicon-oxide material in new RRAM memory devices

July 11th, 2014

Rice’s silicon oxide technology can now be used to fabricate devices with conventional production methods, which brings it a step closer to mass production. James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted. AZonano.com (This article also appeared in HardOCP, […]

Rice’s silicon oxide memories catch manufacturers’ eye-Rice News

July 10th, 2014

Rice University’s breakthrough silicon oxide technology for high-density, next-generation computer memory is one step closer to mass production, thanks to a refinement that will allow manufacturers to fabricate devices at room temperature with conventional production methods. http://bit.ly/1nhWTQE http://news.rice.edu/2014/07/10/rices-silicon-oxide-memories-catch-manufacturers-eye/

Rice’s silicon oxide memories catch manufacturers’ eye

July 10th, 2014

Rice’s silicon oxide technology can now be used to fabricate devices with conventional production methods, which brings it a step closer to mass production. James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted. Phys.org http://bit.ly/1q1NbF2 http://phys.org/news/2014-07-rice-silicon-oxide-memories-eye.html

Rice research papers ranked among top 10 most read in ACS Nano

March 17th, 2014

James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science; alumna Daniela Marcano ’11; and Naomi Halas the Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics and professor of physics and astronomy, are featured for […]

Research overview: Graphene for oil exploration

December 20th, 2013

James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted in an article about the use of graphene in oil exploration. Science World Report http://bit.ly/1bV5CkI

Graphene nanoribbons an ice-melting coat for radar

December 19th, 2013

Science Daily (This article also appeared on Environmental Research Web, India Everyday, Computer World Australia, TechWorld Australia, Australian Reseller News, Computer World Norge, Linux World and Computer World UK.) http://bit.ly/1hnYdN5

Car paint with graphene gets ice off radar domes

December 19th, 2013

James Tour, the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry and professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science, is quoted in articles about the practical application of graphene nanoribbons and graphene in oil exploration. Futurity http://bit.ly/18AXyax

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